Evolution of the Hipster

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Quote of the Day

“Levi Johnston To Affix Name To Book To Be Written By Author To Be Unnamed Later” – Ace

(Actually, “title of the day”.)

Wonkette attacks child with Downs Syndrome

I must not think bad thoughts; I must not think bad thoughts…

The Ace of Spades blog has some interesting thoughts about Obama supporters and “preference cascades” :

This gets into my point about Obama and polling. Race undeniably helped Obama. This is also obvious.

But as people begin leaving wait-and-see mode and entering evaluate-and-judge, are they going to keep thinking “Well, he’s black, so I should studiously scour any and all negative thoughts from my mind, even though he’s brought my family and my business little but misery for three years” or are they going to think, “Gee, maybe I shouldn’t have voted for him last time just because he was black. Maybe this time I should ask about his actual accomplishments and qualifications, apart from his general resemblance to a mash-up of a Heroic Young Crusader played by Will Smith and a Gentle Older Sage played by Morgan Freeman.”

Preference cascade — when once-falsified (falsified even to oneself)suppressed ideas are suddenly too glaringly obvious to be falsified any further and break, unexpectedly and tectonically, from the repressed subconscious to the conscious mind.

Latin?

Hoo doggies.  I now don’t feel all that bad about taking Latin back in high school.

Hard as it may be to believe, one of the things that gives privately-educated children the edge is their knowledge of Latin. I don’t just mean in the obvious senses – their grasp of basic grammar and syntax, their understanding of the ways in which our world is underpinned by the classical world, their ability to read Latin inscriptions. I mean there is actually a substantial body of evidence that children who study Latin outperform their peers when it comes to reading, reading comprehension and vocabulary, as well as higher order thinking such as computation, concepts and problem solving.

For chapter and verse on this, I recommend a 1979 paper by an educationalist called Nancy Mavrogenes that appeared in the academic journal Phi Delta Kappan. Summarising one influential American study carried out in the state of Iowa, she writes:

“In 1971, more than 4,000 fourth-, fifth- and sixth-grade pupils of all backgrounds and abilities received 15 to 20 minutes of daily Latin instruction. The performance of the fifth-grade Latin pupils on the vocabulary test of the Iowa Test of Basic Skills was one full year higher than the performance of control pupils who had not studied Latin. Both the Latin group and the control group had been matched for similar backgrounds and abilities.”

Interestingly, Mavrogenes found that children from poor backgrounds particularly benefit from studying Latin. For a child with limited cultural reference points, becoming acquainted with Roman life and mythology opens up “new symbolic worlds”, enabling him or her “to grow as a personality, to live a richer life”. In addition, spoken Latin emphasises clear pronunciation, particularly of the endings of words, a useful corrective for many children born in inner cities. Finally, for children who have reading problems, Latin provides “experience in careful silent reading of the words that follow a consistent phonetic pattern”.

Read the rest here.